Orange Fade – A Poem from the Archives

Orange Fade

Orange fade into Midnight Blue

Tribal tales told.
Legends on the edge of memory
recited around campfires
with children’s enthusiastic smiles
showing crooked teeth.
Gleaming eyes
mirroring the embers.
Coals burning low and cold.

Midnight Blue into Autumnal Gold

Music melodies made.
Rhythms rhyming in tune with
nightingale song.
Hollow beats. Crickets cheap.
Under bough
over leaves
atop the moist grass green on the hill
young men and women
dance.

Autumnal Gold into Yellow Wane

Hymnals hang heavily.
Choirs caroling in echoing halls
amid alters lighted by sun
stained glass.
Men in solemn reverence bow.
Women in fragrant gardens walk.
Spirits adrift on seas
of jasmine and lavender.

Yellow Wane into Orange Fade

Mythological memories made.
Stories spreading across unmarked
lands lost
in a nostalgic haze.
Aged do the elders speak
of yesterday’s ghosts.
Of shadows they did seek
while chasing the elusive ray
cast by the sun
one bright day.

****************************************************************************************

Here is my second entry from the archives. This one required a little editing, but not much, and I kept it in the centered page format. I seemed to like this format back then… Anyway, even though I did edit it, I found that on a couple of instances, after I changed a word, or a break, or whatever it was, and I read the revision I did not like it. I went over a few more ways that I could edit it, but was satisfied with none of them either, and ended up going back to the beginning and putting it back to how I had it in the first place. Sometimes, even your younger self knew what the hell you were talking about, and new how best to say it.

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2 thoughts on “Orange Fade – A Poem from the Archives

  1. This is a colorful imagery, Joe. Romantic and sweet. I’d like to share something with you: when I was little, we (the neighborhood and I) did gather when the moon was full, to listen to stories and music by our storytellers, while the older ones and the adults enjoyed jokes and drank alcohol.

    This work, though old, is a stand-out piece. No wonder you found that it was still a class above the recent edits.

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